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. now lying in piles of rubble that stretch for miles across the new york city borough of staten island. cleanup is underway. and with every new layer of debris that's removed, the tragic stories emerge of the residents whose lives have been turned upside down. cnn's brian todd is on the scene for us. brian, what are you seeing on staten island right now? >> reporter: well, wolf, at just about every house you go to in the section of staten island you hear horrific and pretty detailed stories of just how bad the storm was. here's the story of one man who took a few hits. if you can't imagine what it's like to suffer through a massive storm, listen to nick. >> the water was so high. it was up to this part of the door. i couldn't get into the door. i went around the side of the house. and i stood on a box that was floating. and i went through the window to get back in the house with my family. >> reporter: taking us through his house on staten island, the retired ups truck driver says he and his family scrambledto n upper floor away from water he was sure was going to keep rising. his wife
, news that is especially welcome here on this hard-hit island. the new york city marathon scheduled for sunday which starts here on the island has been canceled for the first time in its 42-year history, and that is a huge welcome relief to a lot of people here, who frankly were just outraged the idea that the marathon would take place and would take resources that are still badly needed here. there's a lot of people here on this island tonight who feel like they have been forgotten and it really wasn't until today that they started to see supplies coming in and a lot of it in the area that i'm in right now, is just volunteers. folks who have come here on their own from other parts of the city or other parts of staten island with food, whatever they can bring. there's a lot of folks who live down the street in pitch blackness and they're afraid to leave their destroyed houses because of safety concerns. they don't want to leave their things out. this is the home of a woman named sheila. it's all that's left of her home. she's lived here for some 40 years. she was able to salvage a f
it seemed like no one moving. >> i think anyone that tried to drive in new york city realized there are a lot of cars on the road. traffic is very heavy. >> reporter: new york's mayor bloomberg announced bridges in manhattan are open but limiting most incoming cars to three occupants or more. for the subways limited service tomorrow but a lot of work ahead. kennedy is up and running. la guardia still closed. the crane, now they say it is tied down and secure. but elsewhere, no progress. only a clearer view of the loss. here in new york city's breezy point more homes destroyed than first thought. and on the jersey shore, a simple fact comes to thought for the mayor of seaside heights. >> we are taking baby steps. we will sort it out at the end trying to get semblance of what was. >> a short time ago andrew cuomo tweeted this picture that we want to show you. a picture of national guard troops moving patients out of bellvue hospital. he thanked them for their help. they have been working tirelessly to get the patients to safety and work the bucket brigade that has been carrying
like i have never experienced in my life in new york city. it's something that has been missing on the streets of new york during the storm. they were empty, but today with public transportation shut down, and the crane disruption, commuters sat for hours and hours and hours in bumper-to-bumper traffic. we ran into a lot of trouble ourselves as we tried to get to hoboken. it took us a half hour to move two blocks and another two plus hours to get to hoboken which is five miles away. hopefully this will make the commute easier for some, tomorrow parts of the new york city subway will reopen which is miraculous because the pictures you're seeing, that's still the case in some parts of the system but they've managed to open other parts. it's an incredible testament to new york. still to come, coming to the rescue, i spent the day with the national guard in hoboken, new jersey, going door to door helping people from their homes and governor cuomo of new york visited what's left of a queens neighborhood torched by a massive fire. residents tried to come home for the first time and fo
. welcome, everybody. our "starting point" this morning, the aftermath of the superstorm. new york city slowly getting back to normal this morning, but no heat, no power, gas running low. bumper to bumper traffic. patience is being tested. some subways are running again this morning, so many are buses. fares, free, today, as workers are trying to keep the financial heart of the country beating. rob marciano this morning at the brooklyn bridge for us. hey, rob, good morning! >> reporter: good morning, soledad. there'll be a lot of foot traffic once again over this bridge. and if you are in a car, you'll need at least three people in that vehicle. carpooling is going to be the call today, because yesterday, there was absolute gridlock across the city. we didn't have much in the way of bus lines running. these subways were still shut down. all the people that would typically travel underground were trying to get to work aboveground. and boy, some places, there was chaos. i mean, people pushing and shoving, just to try to get on a bus. many buses that were traveling past 10th and 14th stree
senses, canceling the new york city marathon. why? because the storm story isn't over. we have the pictures to show you. >>> a new poll is out in what could be the state that decides the election. >>> and new report looks at the cia's role in the benghazi attack and what it means for director petraeus. let's go "outfront." i'm erin burnett and good evening. "outfront" tonight, bloomberg comes to his senses. after days of standing his ground despite anger, frustration and resentment, the new york city mayor late tonight canceled sunday's marathon. it is the biggest in the world. he said we cannot allow a controversy over an athletic event to distract attention away from the critically important work being done for the storm. the controversy, holding a marathon with all the generate rs, food, water and police that requires as new yorkers still reel from sandy. on staten island today, there was this message for the mayor. after what we heard from person after person there. we were there again today and met this owner of a local garden inn. this hotel is overflowing with people sha
anger, frustration and resentment, the new york city mayor late tonight canceled sunday's marathon. it is the biggest in the world. he said we cannot allow a controversy over an athletic event to distract attention away from the critically important work being done for the storm. the controversy, holding a marathon with all the generate rs, food, water and police that requires as new yorkers still reel from sandy. on staten island today, there was this message for the mayor. after what we heard from person after person there. we were there again today and met this owner of a local garden inn. this hotel is overflowing with people sharing rooms. every one of his rooms, people there have nowhere else to go. richard refused to kick them out to make room for the marathon runners that were supposed to stay there. >> people are dying on staten island. they are dying. and i have a dilemma, do i pull people out who have no place to go to make room for marathon runners? i don't think so. i'm not doing it. i can't do it. >> while victims on staten island and many other new yorkers are reliev
. proof this afternoon evacuations at another major new york hospital, bellview. in the city it seemed like no one moving. >> anyone trying to drive around new york city today realized traffic was very heavy. >> new york mayor bloomberg announcing bridges were open but limiting cars to three or more. a lot of work ahead. kennedy airport up and running laguardia still closed that crane now they say it is tied down and secure. elsewhere no pregonogress. only a clearer view. here on the jersey shore a simple fact comes home to the mayor of seaside heights. >> we are at ground zero. we will sort it out at the end. but right now we are trying to get an asem ambulance of what was. >> a lot of people are wondering when the power will be restored. we are blocks from city hall. this is an area where the water was up to the headlights of the cars here. it is now up to midway on my shins my knees. you bet a sense of how much the water has gone down. but there are these photographs floating throughout the water. this is a photograph of somebody's pet. people's possessions in this water and this is
the wild aspect of the arctic as a natural eco system. >> new york city is a city shaped by water, built on water, it is an island. 520 miles of coastline. it is very vulnerable. on top of that, the city was designed before the sea levels rose a foot. you've actually been warning, from what i understand, city officials for years about this and what might happen in terms of something like sandy. so, what kind of response did you get? i'm just curious. >> in new york city mayor bloomberg and governor cuomo, a lot of talk about protecting the city from storms like this. but, unfortunately, the action has fallen far short of the talk. for instance, while some simple measures had been taken over the last few decades, there were still subway entrances which were too low and which, therefore, the storm surge was able to go down and swamp the subways and stop the system. the electoral power plants, for instance, it one feeding my house, the distribution stations were down by the river instead of up in safe territory where they should have been moved. this is an old city and a lot of infrastructu
people here in new york city, a lot by overhead power lines, the trees are going to blow into the power lines and the power is going to go out. you have the raging floodwaters that came in two feet higher that came over the walls. we built protections for the substations a foot and a half higher than the most historic storm surge ever to hit new york and it still couldn't handle it. i mean, this was just off the charts and unfortunately we are where we are and unfortunately just like all of the other utilities up and down the east coast right now, trying to recover and get everybody back as quick as we can. >> i appreciate you coming on the show and i hope you can get everybody back in manhattan and as you say the wider area it could be another week. can you guarantee that everybody will be back on a week by saturday, for instance? >> we're saying that we're going to get almost everybody. virtually everyone back by next weekend and then there will still be more to go after that. unfortunately, with storms like this, with -- you're talking about trees going into power lines, coming down
in new york city is starting to come back. some subway lines and amtrak are going to run on a schedule. at least there was some public transportation to help them. the congestion eased a bit thanks to a car pool rule. that made a difference. all three major airports were open today for the first time since the storm hit at limited capacity. well, the military used cargo jets to fly power trucks and crews from california to try to help new york clean up sandy. 69 vehicles from southern california were flown in from the west coast. they also sent generators and water pumps to help with clean-ups. the navy will be on stand by in case the state government asks for them help. and now, picking up the pieces from sandy. staten island is a 60 square mile portion of new york city and it suffered some of the worst devastation from the storm. 19 of the city's deaths happened on staten island and today, i toured some of the hardest hit areas and spoke with residents just beginning to pick up the piecing of their shattered lives. this is quincy avenue and you still can't get close to house number 8
. ♪ guts. glory. ram. >>> a lot of runners who travel to new york city to run in that new york city marathon this morning, instead headed to staten island and other areas hit hard by that superstorm sandy. they delivered relief supplies and helped victims clean out their flooded homes and though the storm's that struck -- intent on running the race they had trained for months to finish. they participated in unofficial alternative marathon that was organized on facebook. >>> celebrity chef and cookbook author was born in queens and his culinary career has included stops across new york city. so when superstorm sandy left millions without a decent meal, despirito did what he does best. he cooked up some soup and headed to the worst hit neighborhoods and started passing it out. rocko you have made your rounds, queens, manhattan, borooklyn, ad now staten island. what's it like to hand out so many meals to so many in need? >> it's wonderful to have a skill that's actually useful in a storm situation like this. i cook and people are hungry, it's a perfect match. >> how do you even go abou
treated and so much untreated and the water that comes in new york city comes from 50, 100 miles away from the catskills and down big aqua ducts and the mayor says it's safe. i'm still telling everybody i that you can to that if you have a stove that works, boil it. >> boil the water. >> it doesn't matter. there's cracks, seams, other places that things can go when you have this much sewage in the regular water all around you, you just want to have that kind of precaution. >> and then you have the people who are trying to salvage what they have. they have their clothes and soaked in the sewage-filled water and some of them cleaning them with peroxide. is that good enough? >> well, for anything that has touched floodwaters and the floodwaters have gone away, clothes or anything, you want to remember that it's still not clean. right? because even though it's dry it is not clean. >> so then what you do? >> peroxide is one thing but there are other things to do but you want to be really careful. just because it's dry doesn't mean it's clean. for example, if floodwaters came in contact with pac
anybody that tried to thrive around new york city today realized there are a lot of cars on the road, traffic is very heavy. >> new york mayor's michael bloomberg announced bridges open. tomorrow, subways opened but a lot of work ahead. laguardia still closed. that crane, now they say it's tied down and secure. but elsewhere, no progress. only a clearer view of the loss. here at breezy point, more homes destroyed than first thought. and on the jersey shore, a simple fact comes home to the mayor of seaside heights. >> we're at ground zero. we're taking baby steps right now, and we'll sort it out at the end, right now, it's trying to, you know, just trying to get some kind of semblance of what was. >> a short time ago, new york governor andrew cuomo sweeted this picture we want to show you. a picture of national guard troops moving patients out of bellevue hospital and thanked them for their help. working tirelessly to get patients to safety and work the bucket brigade that has literally been carrying fuel to the emergency generators, up multiple flights of stairs. the evangsituaticuat
insisting this sunday's new york city marathon would go on, mayor bloomberg canceled the race. many were outraged the city would take valuable efforts away from the recovery efforts for the marathon. tonight, city hall and race officials have called it off. meanwhile, look at this. cars lined up for miles to get gas. drivers in some cases waiting 20 hours as the supply dwindles, fighting with each other. there's one report that a guy pu pulled a gun at one gas station. tonight the military is delivering fuel to the disaster zone, sending 24 million gallons of extra gas, a welcome sign. the obama administration is hiring trucks to bring the gas to staging areas. all this is unfolding four days before the general election. president obama and governor romney fighting it out for every last vote, especially in the key state of ohio. today the latest cnn poll shows obama with a very slight edge there, but there's everything to play for. today, the last jobs report before election day was released. unemployment ticking up to 7.9%, but at the same time, 171,000 jobs were created. no surprise, b
and empathy for the groups, his visit. i think he was smart not to go into new york city, where it's too congested, too many problems. i think he's also done well in terms of showing the power of the office by just the latest move of having the military assist in delivery of fuel. it also shows up the hollowness of governor romney, his flip-flopping. for example, on the issue of fema, he was suggesting months ago that maybe you don't need a federal emergency management agency, maybe you can just let each state fend for itself. now, imagine where we would be if someone had actually taken that advice and killed fema. you would have new york, new jersey, each fighting with each other for scarce resources, for fuel, for power, for electric line repair, competing against each other to bring in assistance from other states instead of having someone to coordinate it and push it. >> we obviously saw the extraordinary scenes this week in many ways of governor christie in new jersey, sort of metaphorically putting his arm around the president, telling him what a great president he was. last thing
are still waiting for the power to come back on. >> it is going to be another very slow go in new york city this morning with more unprecedented dumper to bumper traffic and limited subways and buses but they will be mobbed. take a look at this. a sale of two cities, a photo of the iconic brooklyn bridge, lights out on the manhattan side, lights on in brooklyn. what a picture. that really says it all. our dr. sanjay gupta is standing by at belle hospital where patients are on the move because power failed but first to rob marciano. governor cuomo declared a transportation emergency. if you see it here you'll know why. there will be no fares for subways and buses but many of these lines aren't up and running yet, are they? >> yeah, so the fares, you have free fare, that's great but if you can't get on one, you can't get on one. the subways will run north of 34th street but because of that, lack of subway service, the buses are completely jammed. and so you can't even get on a bus. there's people pushing and shoving just to try to squeeze their way on so frustration already building yesterday
confirmation from the new york city buildings department they began operations to secure that crane this morning. workers are in the process of securing that boom which did collapse monday night. some say it was 40 mile-per-hour wind gusts. others say even higher than that. but that entire seven block area around 157 had been closed off because, of course, there is great concern whether anybody walking by the building or driving past the building might be in harm's way. so, again, there are efforts under way right now to try to secure that boom of that bent up crane there at 157 in manhattan. >>> straight ahead, we'll talk to a staten island borough official about the recovery efforts and why some residents say they are the storm's forgotten victims. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>>
by sandy's fierce winds in new york city. officials say it could take up to 36 hours to finish that job. in the aftermath of super storm sandy, getting back to normal seems like a distant reality. survivors pleading for basic necessities. most importantly, power. one young lady, she's 11 years old. her family lives on one of the only powered blocked in hoboken, nnk nj. with the assistance of her dad, she set up a pop-up internet cafe and charging station right in front of her house allowing dozens of people to get back on the grid. if only for just a few minutes and return for a suggested donation. lucy is making her mark. she spoke to me earlier about what she's doing with that money. >> all the money we raised, which is $392, we were going to donate to the red cross. and we also received a generous donation of $2500 from someone who was going to run the marathon, but, since it was cancelled, he donated all the money he would have spent going to the marathon and donated it to the red cross. lucy says about 100 people visited her charging station. we'll get to super storm sandy in just
$30 billion to $50 billion. >>> the new york city burrow of staten island was hit. angry residents are crying out for help. today, homeland secretary janet napolitano will visit staten island with fema. >>> new york city's subway system is still down. other tunnels are without power because they are located in parts of the city in the darks. >>> a new problem flaring up, they are running out of gas. cars and gas powered generators. a lot of people are using those. frustration turning into anger and rage on long lines across the tri-state area. the shortages may not end for another week. >>> people waiting for hours, some waiting for so long, the gas stations actually close without them getting a single drop of fuel. rob is following all of this. rob, i was driving in at 2:30 a.m. and there was a line for gas that looks like it was three hours long at 2:30 a.m. this is bad. >> reporter: yeah, it's crazy. that may be the average. anywhere from a half mile long to, in some cases in new jersey a full mile long to get gasoline. the problem is two-fold. you have gas stations out of power
news tonight. a nightmare in new york city. hundreds of thousands of people trying to fight their way on buses. traffic at a standstill outside of our studio here in columbus circle. 1.7 million people without power in the wake of superstorm sandy. a storm that killed 56 people. the crisis is far from over. ambulances tonight lining up outside of new york's bellvue hospital to evacuate 700 patients. pumps that supply oil to generators are under water. the new jersey flames raging through the shore town of mantoloking. but picture of the day has to be this. the mutual admiration society saw president and governor chris christie. this is what the president promised the victims of superstorm sandy. >> we are here for you. we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure you get all of the help you need until you rebuild. >> meanwhile, six days until election day, mitt romney is in the must-win state of florida with a new bipartisan tone. >> i've got to be able to reach across the aisle and get good democrats and republicans to work together. good democrats love america, just like good
the right side of your screen as the new york city skyline is plunged into darkness. there it goes. today, nearly 5 million homes and businesses are still without power. the death toll is inching up again. superstorm blamed for 56 deaths in the united states. half the victims just in new york city. the mayor says he expects that number to rise. officials say it is a miracle no one died in the firestorm that burned 111 homes to the ground in queens. likely cause? broken lines of natural gas. dozens of those fires still burn in several states. we'll have more on that in a minute. >>> last of the patients are now evacuated from new york's bellevue hospital. national guard troops lined the stair dels well to usher out more than 700 patients. soldiers call themselves, quote, a human bucket brigade. >>> jersey shore's fragile barrier islands weren't even a speed bump. ferocious winds and surging floodwaters have left towns and lives in ruins. michael holmes has the latest from the coast. >> reporter: these communities holiday meccas, unrecognizable. surf club pounded into pieces, main roads are
the triumph of new york city. >> 47,000 runners this marathon attracts. on that, thanks for being with me. i'm brooke baldwin. now to wolf blitzer. wolf. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, in the wake of hurricane sandy, shock is turning to fury and anger. searchers on new york city's staten island are still finding bodies. desperate survivors say help isn't getting through. things are getting more dire apparently by the hour. three days after the storm hit, millions of new yorkers still have no power, no food. and they face huge lines trying to get anywhere. and with just five days until the presidential election, we're releasing a new poll from colorado. a must-win state for both candidates. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> while much of the country, even the presidential race is returning to normal today, we're hearing and seeing misery and growing desperation for millions of people in the northeastern united states. here is the big picture as it stands right now. hurricane sandy's blame for at least 88 deaths in the united states and two in canada raising t
closed. new york city is still rationing gas. four new york city hospitals are still closed or only offering limited services and one o the main train services between new jersey and new york city is still operating with limited service. this video shows the new jersey path station flooding the night of the storm. these stations sustained significant damage. the dow was up nearly 208 points. nasdaq up by more than 2%. the s&p higher, too. the reason, traders are more optimistic the fiscal cliff will be avoided. they think leaders in washington will reach some sort of compromise. we shall see if that optimism is merited. >>> well, twinkies live for another day. the hostess brand agreed to mediation. when hostess said it was closing last week, twitter and the world freaked out and blamed the union, which had been on strike since november 9th. today, a bankruptcy judge said he wanted to company and union to e meet one more time. that meeting is going to take place tomorrow. >>> it's been 473 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. moody's downgraded the country of france. today
? >> what are we learning? gosh, what we learned that sandy did quite a number on new york city, and now the damage estimates are tallied up and new york city's mayor michael bloomberg is asking the federal government for $9.8 billion, with a b, $9.8 billion to help in the recovery. follow me here. that's after starting with the city's total public and private losses which were estimated at $19 billion, and then you break that out, so about $4 billion was covered by private insurers, about $5 billion expected to come from fema and then come up with the $9.8 billion figure which is just part of the $30 billion aid package that new york governor andrew cuomo has requested. what mayor bloomberg has done, brooke, he sent a letter to the members of the new york state congressional delegation asking for this money, saying, new york city will struggle to recover in the long-term unless this money -- this federal funding is given. >> was he being specific as far as where in the city the money needs to go the most? >> yeah, you look at the letter, what bloomberg is essentially saying is that, loo
york mayor michael bloomberg canceled the new york city marathon for the first time in its 42-year history. it was set to take place, as you know, tomorrow. bloomberg insisted the race would not have required dive diverting resources from the recovery effort, but it was clear that the marathon was controversial and divisive. >> the race typically attracts 47,000 runners from all over the world and 12,000 volunteers and more than 2 million spectators. critics say it just wasn't right to use generators for the marathon when some people had not had food and power for days. >>> the lights are starting to come on for families in the northeast, but not fast enough for others. five days after the storm, more than 2.5 million customers are without power across 15 states and d.c. it could be at least another week before power is fully restored and the cold weather is not helping matters. >>> national guard troops are helping to clear debris so crews can get back to putting that power back on. they're also helping in the search for survivors and delivering food to those in need. 7,400 army a
coverage because new york city was so directly devastated? >> yes. and not only was it magnified because it was new york, but a lot of other reporting outside of new york was minimized or forgotten. i went through and i pulled a bunch of headlines from other communities. farmers urged to keep thurow records due to hurricane sandy. morris county, emergency shelters, charging stations. there was a story out of west virginia because the storms moved through there and there were homes that were destroyed we barely heard about that. so i think the new york media capital and also the sheer size and scope of it sucked this coverage in. >> and even in new york city -- i mean manhattan, it took people four days to realize staten island has been totally devastated. and it took a while for journalists to get to that story. >> the media capital censored in times square and downtown and when you're going into work, literally what you're seeing is the story. >> you know the landmarks and the subways. >> but it took the mayor a way to get there. >> and it's the most populated area so it was affected. i
gas. >> we are walking the 59th bridge in new york city back from work. we have had about a three mile walk both ways. but it is just what new yorkers do. we're coming from queens, going back to our home in long island. we're not the only ones, every which way you look, everybody is doing their own thing. >> there is no traffic cops, not good, not good. >> this is what is in front of our building, that is my building in the back. this went all the way through the building. there is no fences left. >> i'm a train operator, i'm supposed to report here. and it is a ghost town. this is cone island station. normally it is hustle, bustle here, nothing but muck on the street level. >> still windy, the big ship -- >> as you can see behind me, we have downed trees. the only thing this weather is good for is making snowballs. >> the fire crew does not know what happened but there is some thick, black smoke coming out of the ground behind me. and as you can see, the fire crew is back there at york avenue. everybody is gathered together. and more emergency responders are arriving. >> oh, the kids
angry, very, very angry. 88 deaths and at least 37 in new york city. why is it taking so long to fix this? i'll speak to one of the top people at con edison. residents are pleading for help of the storm that tossed boats around like toys. i'll talk to some of them in just a moment. and another huge storm could hit next week. i'll talk to chad myers about that. in the wake of a superstorm, climate change. and five days until election day. listen to what mitt romney said in virginia beach earlier. >> would you want four more years where -- i think it will be helpful to have a president who actually understands job creation. >> our cnn orc pochlt shows obama at 50 and romney at 48. we begin with one of the hardest hit areas from hurricane sandy, staten island where the death toll continues to rise. with me now is the assembly woman and another resident of staten island, anthony, who rescued his brother from the storm. welcome to you both. >> thank you very much. >> let me start with you, if i may, assembly woman. this is what the staten island president james molinaro said about the red
candiotti, long beach, new york. >>> so which city came out tops on our best cities list? i'll give you a hint. it has streetcars, a resurgent nfl team and some awesome seafood. [ male announcer ] this is bob, a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xa
, the one in the triangle shirt ways factory in new york city in 1911. it was the deadliest industrial accident in the history of new york city. 146 garment workers died in that fire, and most of them were women, just like in that fire in bangladesh. just like in bangladesh the death toll would have been much lower if there was appropriate emergency exits. in na case a lot of doors had been locked, and now there are reports that could have been the case with locked or stuck doors in bangladesh now in 2012. the new york city fire eventually helped to spur the growth of the international ladies garment workers union, which fought for better working conditions for sweat shop workers. we have every hope that the very sad events of this weekend will do the same for bangladesh, because whether it comes to sweatshops like the ones in bang ala desh, it's not as simple as saying don't buy foreign-made clothes. these women need the jobs and work. bangladesh is one of the poorest companies in the world. the garment industry is huge for
with utility crews scrambling to plug hundreds of explosive leaks. on new york city, staten island, all the worst that sandy brought is all coming home. >> total, total devastation. i live a mile from the beach. how did that water get to my house? >> and there has not been as much attention on staten island as there should have been. so much heart ache out there. the 88 people who lost their lives in the storm, 13 in the city. two were young boys, brothers who might have survived. that's what their mom says. if her story bears out, it wouldn't have taken a miracle either. just a neighbor doing the right thing. gary tuckman has their story. >> reporter: a ford explore er on the side of the street in the staten island, new york. the car seats remain where two little boys, brandon and connor moore were sitting as their mother glenda was driving during hurricane sandy, desperately looking for shelter. the sfoer is sad, horrifying, terrifying. she was driving her suv down this street. it plunged into this hole during the height of hurricane sandy. she then got out of the vehicle wither had 2
. at least 19 people, and that is almost half of the total for the entire toll for new york city, a and there is no light. there is no heat. there is no power. food now has been running short. fear has been running high. just listen to this woman. >> we are going to die if we get killed with the weather. we are going to die. we are going to the freeze. we have 90-year-old people. we are going to die. you don't understand. you have to get your trucks here on this corner, now. >> we are trying to get to you -- >> this is three days. >> the man to whom donna solli was pouring out her heart was new york's senior senator charles schumer who was on a tour of staten island, and even for those of us who live in the new york area, the death and the destruction unleashed by sandy and the pain and the fear of the recovery process are really difficult to completely comprehend. take for instance all of the people working behind me who are coming to work and seeing this as they pass by. no gas. people are lining up everywhere with cans and if they are not sitting in their cars for hours to wai
for the largest veterans day parade in the nation. ♪ first we're going to take you to new york city. veterans were praised for their work in helping recovery efforts after superstorm sandy. now to washington, president obama laid a wreath at the tomb of the unknowns at arlington cemetery. >> this is the first veterans day in a decade in which there are no american troops fighting and dying in iraq. [ applause ] 33,000 of our troops have now returned from afghanistan, and the transition there is under way. after a decade of war, our heroes are coming home. >> president obama says returning veterans deserve quality care to deal with physical and psychological war wounds. >>> more than 60 years ago a world war ii soldier composed a symphony detailing the story of the war and the peace that followed. but for years the music sat on a shelf collecting dust. now that 93-year-old veteran is getting to hear the first live performance of the work he created decades ago. >> my name is harold van buglun and my age is 93, and i am a veteran of world war ii. in 1945 i was stationed in new orleans, louisiana, at
in manhattan, new pleas for help from another hard-hit new york city borough. we're talking about queens. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we're now just three days from the presidential election and the race for the white house is reaching a fever pitch. both campaigns are making a final push for the candidates. their wives, the former president bill clinton, the house speaker john boehner all campaigning down to the wire. cnn is covering their every move. our correspondents are in key locations in critical states. any one of which could ultimately decide who will be the next president of the united states. we're going to -- let's go to colorado right now. mitt romney is speaking there but jim acosta is there setting the stage. tell us what's going on. >> reporter: mitt romney just arrived here just a few moments ago. he has been delivering his closing argument to the crowd here and he's been doing that all day long. waking up in new hampshire, moving on to iowa and here in colorado for two stops. he has been going after the president on that new unemployment data, he has
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